Episode 132 with David Cole

Can you protect your family and your co-workers? How about treating the injured until help arrives? We have four new examples of armed defense.

Rob- Introduction- Welcome to episode 123 of Self-Defense Gun Stories. I’m glad you found us. This podcast is for people who are curious about a firearm for self-defense, and for those who already own one. I’m your host, Rob Morse. We’re joined this week by self defense instructor David Cole.

Hi, David.  You took on a new discipline besides martial arts and handgun competition.

David- Hi, Rob.  I’ve been practicing with my new bow. It’s a whole new challenge.

Rob- and getting better. How do you listen to the show?

David- I’m sort of “old school”…I actually still use an iPod for almost all of my listening. Who’d have thought an iPod would be “retro”? The easiest way for most people is probably with their cell phone.

Rob- That is how most people listen. Please put us in your pocket and give us rating on I-Tunes and Stitcher. Please leave a comment to tell us what you liked about the show.

Now that we’ve talked about how to listen, tell our new listeners what to expect.

David- We’re going to look at several news stories about armed defense.  These gun owners survived a life threatening situation. They succeeded, but were they lucky, or did they have a good plan? What should we do if we were in their place, and how would we learn those new skills?

Our first story took place last week in Kissimmee, Florida

Rob- First story-  Do you have a way to defend yourself when you meet someone to buy a cellphone?

You want a new cell phone. You searched around and found a seller on Craigslist. You agree to meet at nearby store. It is daylight and there are people around, so it looks safe enough.

You meet the seller and ask to see the phone. He raises the price and raises his voice. He angrily demands to see the money.

You are carrying your handgun concealed. The buyer gets angrier and he tells you to give him all your money. He reaches for his belt.

You step back and draw your handgun. You fire as you run away. The robber gets in his car and drives away. You call police.

The police find the robber and take him to a local hospital. They take the robber’s gun as evidence. Police book your attacker for armed robbery.

This story sounds scary, but is it that unusual?

David- Citizens defend themselves with guns thousands of times a day. Most are assaults in public.

Rob- What is the first thing we should do to defend ourselves?

David- Think about your defense now, and where your risks are. Daylight in a public place may present less risk, but any encounter involving meeting a stranger to exchange cash is not risk-free. Don’t buy into the falsehood that “it’s a safe neighborhood,” or worse, “it can’t happen to me”.

Call your police department and ask them if they have a place with video cameras so people can safely buy and sell face to face. Most do, and it doesn’t cost you a thing to be safer tomorrow.

Rob- It sounds like our defender carried a gun on his body when he was attacked.

David- Have your defensive tools.  Have a permit, if required in your state…but don’t stop there. Learn how to present, and then practice it.

Rob- Someone who doesn’t have a gun can’t master self-defense this afternoon. What are the stepping stones to get there.

David- The best, first thing that anyone can do is incorporate awareness and good personal safety habits into their daily life. Read! (Jeff Cooper, David Fowler, Steve Tarani, Andrew Branca) And you don’t need a gun of your own to get started. Many ranges and schools have loaners or rentals you can use…and that might be the best way to learn which gun you might want to purchase. Then once you’ve made that decision, continue to train and practice.

That is enough for now. Our second story happened last week in Greenville, South Carolina.

Rob- Second Story-  Are you armed as you leave home and get in your car?   

You own a gun. You have your concealed carry permit. You put your gun on as you dress for the day. You’re walking out to your truck parked in the driveway. As you open the door to climb in you see someone come around the corner of your house. He is wearing dark clothes, a sweatshirt, a hat, and has a bandana over his face. He says something, but it is hard to understand him.He also has a gun in his hand. You’re not used to seeing a gun pointed at you, but it is clear you’re being robbed.

You move out of the way as your attacker fires at you. You draw your gun and fire at him. He runs away. You run back in the house and call police.

You are shaking with excitement, but you’re not hit. The police find the bullet holes in your truck and your house where the robber fired as he ran away.

David- Being both prepared and aware made the difference. Not only did our citizen have his defensive firearm on his person…where it should be!…he also had his head up and his eyes open. This allowed him to see the threat and react.

Rob- What would you tell a beginner to do?

David- Drop the keys and run.

Rob- What did our defender do correctly?

David- When the would-be robber decided he had urgent business elsewhere, our good guy let him go. Don’t chase the bad guys. A concealed carry license does not make us police officers; we carry to defend, not to apprehend. Take care of your own safety, and call the police.

Rob- Two interactions w the police. 911 and then with officers who arrive. What do you tell your students to do?

David- Be the first to call. I personally plan to give the dispatcher my physical description, and to let them know that I am licensed and armed. Do not have a gun in your hand when the police roll up…don’t assume that they know you are the good guy. Show them empty hands, and expect to be handcuffed until they sort things out.

Rob- What could our good guy have done better?

David- Practice shooting, because our good guy missed. A more committed robber may have pressed the attack, and misses don’t count.

Rob- Most people don’t practice that way when they go to  the range. They don’t practice as if their life depended on the first shot.

David-  Stepstones. Safety, routine handling, concealed carry, presentation and self-defense.

Rob- What else do you notice.
David- Well, I couldn’t help but notice that in the video interview of our good guy, he happily shows the interviewer his revolver…with his finger on the trigger. He won the day, but he could clearly use a bit more training. Shooting yourself is a less than ideal way to begin a gunfight.

Rob- Sounds like our defender has to go back to a firearms safety class.

David- We cover review that in every class. Our next story took place in Louisville, Kentucky.

Rob- Fist this message from my friends at CPRC

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Rob- third story- Are you armed as you sit in your office?

A customer comes into your office. He needs some paperwork processed for a car he bought. The man seems upset and argues with one of the clerks who is trying to help him. Finally, the clerks ask him to leave. The customer says he is going to get a gun and come back and shoot up the place.

The two clerks in the front of the store step outside to see if the customer is coming back. The customer shoots at the two clerks.

That is when you get up from your desk. You are a gun owner. You have your carry permit and are armed. You shoot at the attacker and he runs. You call police and ask for EMTs to treat your injured friends.

The police ask if you know who attacked your co-workers. Of course you do since he gave you his name and address.

A K9 unit finds the attackers gun near the scene of the crime. Police arrest your attacker. He had a previous drug conviction. This time he is charged with two counts of assault, possession of a handgun by a convicted felon, wanton endangerment, tampering with physical evidence, trafficking a controlled substance, possession of a controlled substance.

David- The most important thing I learned during my time as a police officer is that there are no “Mayberrys”. There are truly bad, violent people in your world. There are career criminals who view you as simply an obstacle to what they want. They do not value life as we do, and have zero concern for you.

Rob- What should we do.

David- POGO. Be alert, be vigilant. Have defensive tools and the skills to use them.

At home. At the office. This was Kentucky, so you can get your CCW. You could carry as you go to lunch or to the bank…and not all businesses are “gun free zones.”

Rob- You could start to make your family safer today even if you won’t have your permit until tomorrow.

David- Kentucky has made it very easy to get a CCDW. After completing a 6-8 hour training class, you can apply either at your Sheriff’s office or online through the Kentucky State Police. The online process is extremely quick, and I have heard of people actually having their license in hand in less than 7 days from submitting their application. Easier to transport to your office with CCW, and a lot of states have “parking lot laws” which allow you to have your gun in your vehicle, even if they don’t let you carry in the office. With this, at least you are able to defend yourself to and from work. The good guy with a gun stopped an attack and saved his co-workers.

Rob- You gave us a plan to be armed. What should we do if this were our office?

David- Ask for help. Treat the injured. Call police. Go get a medical kit and training.

Rob- Did you see injured people as an LEO.

David- Absolutely. And in my current role in corporate security, one of the things I teach is a personal safety and self defense class. In it, one of the things I emphasize is having both the tools and training to care for yourself or others medically until help arrives. I want to keep my family alive until EMTs arrive.

Rob- Even the simplest story is complex. Let’s stop here and go on to our fourth story.

David- I noticed that we’re using four stories now.

Rob- Thank you for listening.

David- Our fourth story took place in Madison, Wisconsin.

Rob- Fourth story- Do you have a gun nearby as you get up out if bed in the middle of the night?

At first you’re not sure if you hear something or not. You listen, and now you’re sure. Someone is breaking into your house. You go to your gun safe and get your handgun. You see the intruder come in through the kitchen window. You shout for him to leave. He does, and in a hurry. Your wife calls the police. You both go check on the two children in the house. Police noticed where the robber cut through your window screens.

David- I like this family. Do you know why the homeowner heard the burglar prying open the window before the intruder got inside the house? He heard the burglar because the homeowner locked his doors. The burglar couldn’t walk in, he had to break in and make noise. Again, don’t assume you live in Mayberry…you don’t.

It starts out as a simple burglary…perhaps the criminal didn’t expect anyone to be home. The problem comes when a resident is home, and things become violent. Then it’s a robbery. A common bit of advice we hear is, “just give them what they want.” But it doesn’t always end there. Better to be armed.

Rob- There were young children in the home. I think they were 5 and 6 years old. How do you keep your gun so you can get it but your children can’t? Fast access safe?

David- The homeowner gave a good description of the intruder. So even though the story doesn’t mention a flashlight or if the homeowner turned on the lights, I think he did.

Rob- so even if I have a dusty gun up on a closet shelf, I should also have a flashlight next to it?

David- Don’t shoot at what you can’t see. It’s difficult to shoot accurately in the dark, and is extremely risky legally and morally. Don’t plan for it. Don’t do it. Plan for a light. Get a light, and practice with a light.

The suspect is described as a white man in his 20’s with an athletic/slender build. He has shoulder-length dirty blonde hair parted down the middle. He was wearing a gray zip-up hooded sweatshirt.

Rob- Did the homeowner have the right to point a gun at an intruder?

David- Yes, but you need to be able to articulate a threat.

Rob- Is there more?

David- Rob- That is enough for now. We’ll be back after this message from Faster Colorado.

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Exit-  Rob- That wraps up this episode. David Cole, thank you for helping us again. Where can we learn more about you?

David- My training website is Aegis Solutions  on Facebook, and I’m also at BlackManWithAGun.com

Rob- Let us know what you think. Do you like the longer podcast with four stories? Do you want more personal news from our instructors? Leave us a message on the podcast facebook page.  We have an inbox there if you don’t want to leave your message in public.

David-  We share this podcast with you for free.  All we ask is that you share the podcast with a friend and give us a rating on I-Tunes and Stitcher.  We’re also available on Google Play Music and Spotify.

This podcast is part of the Self-defense radio network. Find the other shows at sdrn.us

Rob- I’m Rob Morse.  We’ll be back next week with more Self-Defense Gun Stories.

Episode 114 with David Cole

Can you protect innocent victims at home and on the street? Firearms instructor David Cole brings us three news stories of armed civilians who protected themselves.. and those they love. (13 minute audio podcast)

Rob- Introduction- Welcome to episode 114 of Self-Defense Gun Stories.  This podcast is for people who might want a gun for self-defense, and for those who already have one.  I’m your host, Rob Morse. We have firearms instructor David Cole with us as co-host.

David, I see where you’ve been competing with your concealed carry handgun and teaching Aikido.

David- Hi, Rob.  I’ve been working out the kinks competing with a new gun; getting students ready for testing at the dojo.

Rob- Please introduce our podcast to our new listeners.

David- We study three recent examples of armed defense to see what we can learn.  These gun owners survived a life threatening situation because they were armed. What would you in their place?

Our first story took place last week in Atlanta, Georgia.  Here’s what happened.

Rob- First story-  Are you armed at home?  

You’ve finished the dishes and are cleaning up when you hear a woman scream from the front of your home. You walk outside and see three teenagers beating a pregnant woman on the sidewalk in front of your house. One of the teens is hitting the pregnant woman with a handgun. You draw your firearm and point it at the attacker. “Stop! Drop the gun or I’ll drop you,” you shout.  The attacker drops the gun and all three teens run away.

The victim was a Dominos Pizza delivery driver. The three teenage attackers lured her to the house next door where they waited to rob her of her money and her car. EMTs took the victim to the hospital for observation. Police arrested and charged the teenagers, two boys and a girl, all 16 years old.

David- This is a case of a third party intervention, with an overall happy ending. Our victim was very fortunate that there was a good Samaritan nearby who was willing and able to come to her aid.

Rob- Our defender recognized an innocent victim.

David- A smart decision to respond with a gun, since the attack was 3 on 1…even if the attackers had been unarmed, there is still a disparity of force.

Rob- Should the defender have used a verbal warning? Was he already justified to use lethal force and kill all three attackers?

David- It’s easy to armchair quarterback, but the obvious answer is yes, he should have challenged…because it worked…in this case. But it might not always, and he was certainly justified in using lethal force due to the fact that it was 3 on 1, and there was a weapon involved. Also, I don’t know of any state which requires a challenge be issued prior to use of lethal force. But had the attackers been more committed in carrying out the assault, he might have placed himself at an even greater disadvantage by giving the bad guys that warning, and the resulting time to act first.

David- Our second story happened last week near Richmond, Virginia.

Rob- Second Story-  Are you armed at home?

It is the afternoon when you hear someone trying to break into your basement door. You get your gun. The intruder walks up onto your back porch and tries to open your back door. The door is locked. You shout for the stranger to go away and that you are armed. The man picks up a retaining wall stone and breaks the glass of your back door. Then he reaches inside to unlock the door. Your two daughters are inside behind you. You shoot your invader. Now he runs and you call police.

EMTs take him to the hospital. Police report that the intruder met your daughter online and he lives in another country.

David- This mom protected her family. Well done.

Rob- Should she have retreated and called the police?

David- She certainly could have, but there was no way that this was going to end well. He had pursued this girl in online communications for months, despite having been told to stop. He flew halfway around the world, and purchased a knife, pepper spray, and duct tape before going to the girl’s house. I believe that this family was aware that this guy was a problem, and fortunately they were prepared. Had they not been, it could have turned into the stuff of horror movies.

Rob- 22 caliber

David- It worked..this time. Clearly, a centerfire caliber is better, but the gun you have and the gun you can shoot is still better than nothing.

Rob- What do you suggest for your students?

David- As I mentioned, a centerfire caliber is the best choice for most people; .380 as a minimum, and on up from there. It may take a little more training to become proficient, but when you can save your daughter from that sort of fate, wouldn’t that be worth it?

(another link with more detail on the story: https://wtvr.com/2018/06/25/troy-skinner-arrest/ )

David- Our third story happened last week outside Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

Please join and support the Second Amendment Foundation at SAF.org

Rob- Third story- Are you armed when you’re getting a cup of coffee?  

It is early in the morning. You pull into a convenience store for gas and a cup of coffee. You’re walking to the register when you see the reaction on the clerk’s face. You turn around and see a man wearing a hoodie and a black mask over his face. He has a gun in his hand. The clerk runs out the back of the store. You draw your gun and step to the side. The thief turns around and runs. He’d robbed another store a half hour earlier.

David- Third party again…although the customer easily could have become the victim had the situation continued.

Rob- This is one of those common events that are rarely covered in the news. The defender didn’t have to fire his gun.

David- He had his gun on him. Being able to present in in time meant that he did NOT have to press the trigger.

Rob- Do you talk about a situation like this with your students?

David- I think that what probably gave the customer time to act more quickly than the robber could react was due to awareness. It sounds like the customer had his head up and recognized what was going on, and took decisive action before the robber even realized he was there.

Exit-  Rob- That wraps up this episode. David, thank you for helping us today.  Where can we learn more about you?

David- My training website is Aegis Solutions  on Facebook, and I’m also at BlackManWithAGun.com

Rob- You can share your thoughts with us by leaving a message on the podcast facebook page.  

David-   If you liked this show, then you’ll like the other podcasts on the Self-defense radio network. We share this podcast with you for free.  Please share it with a friend and give us a rating on I-Tunes and Stitcher.  We’re also available on Google Play Music and Spotify.

Rob- I’m Rob Morse.  We’ll be back next week with more Self-Defense Gun Stories.

Please support Buckeye Firearms Foundation at https://www.buckeyefirearmsfoundation.org/

Episode 99 with David Cole

Can you protect yourself at home and at work? David Cole brings us three news stories of armed civilians who protected themselves and those they love. (17 minute audio podcast)

Rob- Introduction- Welcome to episode 99 of Self-Defense Gun Stories.  This podcast is for people who might want a firearm, and for those who have one and want to learn more.  I’m your host, Rob Morse.  We have firearms instructor David Cole as co-host this week.

Hi, David.  How have you been?

David- Hi, Rob.  I’ve been loading ammo and helping coach new shooters at USPSA clinics at my club.

David, please introduce our podcast.

David- Each week we study three recent examples of armed defense to see what we can learn. Our first story took place last week in Miami, Florida.   

Rob- First story-   Do you have a gun nearby at night?

You’re a 55 year old woman. You wake up at 1:30 in the morning to the sound of glass breaking. There are other people living in your home with you. You grab your gun and move toward the sound.

You see an intruder in your home and he moves toward you. You shoot him and call the police.

You’re a 25 year old veteran of customs and border patrol. Your intruder is a repeat criminal who is out on parole.

David- Usually barricading in your room is best, but what if there are other in the house who need defending? Kids? A room mate? Learning to move through a structure with a gun is a skill, and doing it properly requires training.

Also, the conventional wisdom is to barricade, but I’m not sure that it always reflects reality. Are we really going to barricade and call the police for every unidentified bump in the night? I don’t think so. I’m not talking about when you know that there is clearly wrong…repeated banging, crashing, footsteps. We hear things like that, we know something is wrong.

But who hasn’t heard a noise and you weren’t sure what it was? Is someone in the house, or was it the bag of trash you set by the door, to take out in the morning, falling over. You’re going to go have a look. You need to learn how to do that correctly and safely.

Rob- You don’t want to shoot your roommate.

David- Barricaded or not, you MUST have a flashlight. The primary reason is target identification…failure to properly identify a threat can land you in prison. There is a lot of misconception around castle doctrine, and a lot of people believe that it means you can legally shoot any trespasser inside your home. Different states may vary a bit, but usually all castle doctrine does is remove the duty to retreat inside your home; some allow for the assumption of intent to harm.

And besides the legal issue, there’s moral issue: Do you REALLY want to shoot someone if you don’t have to…even if legally justified? I don’t. One hypothetical I use to drive this home with folks who don’t get it is this: You hear a noise in the night. You go to check, find your front door splintered, and an obviously drunk man passed out on your couch. It is legal in your state to shoot him. Do you do it? It’s perfectly legal; you will not be arrested or charged. Do you shoot him? Everyone always answers no. I ask why not, and they answer that he is not a threat. Bingo.

David- Low light. You won’t have a clear picture of your sights. Lasers can help, but are no substitute for light. Of course, most of our homes have lights in them, which can be turned on by a switch on the wall…you can use those, too. It was Always funny to watch a new police officer try to clear a building in the dark, rather than just turning the lights on.

Rob – What about giving away your position?

David- We hear this all the time, and I don’t believe it is a concern in most civilian situations. If there is no one there, no harm done. If they are a typical burglar, they are not going to hang around for a gunfight. Not only am I going to turn the lights on, I’m going to shout to them that I am armed. And remember, I’m only going out there if I need to secure another person, or if I am unsure that there is a threat. If those conditions aren’t met, I don’t need to leave my room. I’m going to barricade, call the police, and let the bad guys come to me.

use of cover or concealment. We see motion at night and in our peripheral vision. Use your corners to your advantage. Take a finger-gun and go look at yourself in the mirror. See how little of yourself you need to expose in order to see the target and have a sight picture.

Rob- When do you talk about this with your students?

David- It typically comes up when we talk about legal use of deadly force, and much of the time, they’ll ask about the law concerning home defense before it even comes up in the lesson.

Our second story happened last week in Mitchellville, Maryland.

Rob- Second Story-  Are you armed at home after dark?   

You’re an 83 year old retired school teacher. You live alone. You get up around midnight to take your medication and then you go back to bed. A few minutes later you hear a crashing sound from your basement. You grab your gun from under your pillow. The basement door is locked, but you can see the door from your room. The intruder kicks in your basement door and enters the house. You shoot him twice.

The intruder runs away and you call police. Police take your intruder to the hospital.

David- This is different than our first story because this homeowner doesn’t have anyone living with him. He can wait and make the robber come to him. That is good combat tactics and good legal tactics.

Rob- explain that a little more.

David- Just as we discussed earlier, just because it’s legal to shoot doesn’t mean you should. Personally, morally I don’t want to shoot anyone I don’t have to. But from a legal perspective, even if the letter of the law supports you, you don’t want an overzealous prosecutor portraying you as “hunting down” your “victim.” It happens. If shooting is necessary, then do what must be done.

If I was in a situation like this, where I know I hear someone in the house, coming up the stairs, I’m going straight to our barricade/call PD strategy. I am also going to announce that I am armed and that the police have been called, loudly. This may or may not deter the burglar, but I am going to let him know clearly “I know you are there. I am armed.” I am going to do my best to convince him that he is better off going somewhere else.

Rob- There are a bunch of things I want to do, and I want them all at once. What do we do first.

David- Defensive tool first. Lock your door. Call the police. Win the race to the phone.

Rob- When do your students practice using a flashlight and hiding behind a corner?

I mostly teach only basic concealed carry, and those classes don’t really allow sufficient time to practice those skills, but we do discuss them. I do offer customizable “coaching packages” which can include those skills if a student chooses to take some continuing training.

For our listeners, I would add that there is very little in the typical home which could be considered cover…which stops a bullet. Drywall does a very poor job of stopping bullets, and something more substantial is necessary for that sort of protection. Think about what you might use to fortify your barricade location a little better…heavy wood furniture, etc.

David- Our third story happened last week in Tampa, Florida.

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Rob- Third story- Are you armed at work late at night?

You work in a convenience store. It is 2AM when a customer walks in..only this customer has a gun in his hands. The robber demands the money and waves his gun at you. You open the cash register. You also grab the gun that sits underneath it. You shoot your attacker. The attacker runs.

You follow him and call police.

The Tampa police released this statement. “This is sort of typical self-defense stuff,” said Lt. Urbinas. “If somebody’s threatening you with a firearm, anybody — a clerk, the general public — you have a right to defend yourself. And you can use deadly force if you’re faced with deadly force.”

David- Good that he had a gun.

 The victim had the will to win. I don’t know what he said to the robber, but we know what he did. He put his self-defense plan in place. He grabbed his gun and shot his attacker.

From the news story, it sounds like this might have been a close quarters struggle, which can really complicate things. It is difficult enough to shoot accurately under stress, even more so when you are physically entangled with the attacker, at extreme close quarters.

Some training in extreme close quarters shooting could have helped our defender. It is a very specialized skill, and very dangerous to practice without proper training. I have done some close quarters shooting drills, and it can be very unsettling to have the gun going off that close to your body, and it is very easy to make a mistake and injure yourself.

Fortunately, the leg hit that our good guy made on his attacker was enough…this time. But if his attacker had been more committed to the fight, it might have ended differently. The fact that the robber was able to run away tells us that he could have continued the fight if he wanted to. We can’t depend on our attacker giving up just because we got a hit on an extremity.

Rob- what else do you see.

I tell my students not to follow their attacker. Let them go once they run away.

Rob- How can I do the right thing under that much stress.

Win the call to the police. Win the legal battle. If your business is at risk of robbery, then you should have video cameras. Video cameras can help you win the second fight, the legal fight. But you have to win the first fight…well, first. Defend your life first, but prepare to win the court battle as well.

Exit-  Rob- That wraps up this episode. David, thank you for helping us today.  Where can we learn more about you?

David- Our listeners can find me at Black Man With A Gun and on my Aegis Solutions Facebook page.

Rob- You can share your thoughts with us by leaving a message on the podcast facebook page.  

David-  We share this podcast with you for free.  Please share it with a friend and give us a rating on I-Tunes and Stitcher.  We’re also available on Google Play Music.

Rob- I’m Rob Morse.  We’ll be back next week with more Self-Defense Gun Stories.

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Episode 93 with David Cole

Instructor David Cole joins us this week with three new self-defense stories. Were these gun owners lucky, or were they armed with tools and training? How would you react in their situation? (16 minutes)

Rob- Introduction- Welcome to episode 93 of Self-Defense Gun Stories.  This podcast is for people who might want a firearm.. and for those who already have one.  I’m your host, Rob Morse. Firearms instructor David Cole is our co-host this week. Hi, David.  How have you been?

David- Hi, Rob.  I’ve been…a little chilly.

Rob- One of our listeners asked us to post information about the type of firearms used in these examples. That is a great idea, and we will include that information when we can. David, please introduce our podcast.

David- Each week we discuss three recent examples of armed defense. Our first story took place last week in Putnam County, West Virginia. Here is what happened.

Rob- First story-  Are you armed at home?  

You’re a grandmother and a widow. You live alone. You’re asleep in bed.  It is after midnight when you hear someone trying to pry open your bedroom window. You walk to your dresser and grab your gun. You pull open the blinds and point your gun at the attempted robber. The robber falls over. You see him scramble to his feet and run away. You call police.

David- Sounds like this criminal was lucky to escape. We certainly can’t fault this woman’s mindset…she was definitely ready to do business.

Rob- She didn’t ignore the problem and hope it would go away. It looks like she kept her gun in a dresser drawer. Is that a good idea if she was a grandma with grandkids?

David- While she might want to consider different storage options for her firearms (check out the video) it was great that she challenged the suspect verbally. She didn’t have to kill anyone, and this would prevent a tragedy in a case of mistaken identity. A good flashlight could help, too. It’s also good that she called police, even though the suspect ran away.

Rob- The intruder was only feet away when she surprised him.

Rob- Do you talk about this situation with your students?

David- Our second story happened last week in Akron, Ohio.

Rob- Second Story-  Are you armed at work?   

You’re a pharmacist. You own and operate your own store. It is 9 in the morning and you unlock your front door.  You’re behind the counter when you see three men dressed in black rush inside. Two of them jump over your counter. They pull out bags and start grabbing drugs. One of them shouts for you not to move and reaches for his pocket. So do you. You shoot at the two attackers closest to you. The three men run from the store. You call police.

You give your address and a description of the get-away car. Police arrest one man when he goes to the hospital for treatment of gunshot wounds.

David- Good job in a difficult situation…three on one. Good thing he had a gun handy.

Rob- People sore guns lots of places. The company safe or the cash drawer wouldn’t have worked if there were already guns pointed at you.

David- It would be easy to say that it would be better had he acted before two of them got behind the counter, but it sounds like it happened very fast. He tried cooperating until he felt they may try to harm him, but then acted decisively.

Rob- We talk about tactical patience. That means you wait until you have time to act.  That assumes you’ve practiced so you know how much time you need. Did our defender simply run out of options so he went for it against three robbers?

David- Our third story happened last week in Chicago, Illinois.

Please join and support the Second Amendment Foundation at SAF.org

Rob- Third story- Are you armed when walking on the street?

It is the day after Christmas. You walk out of a store on the southside of Chicago.  It is a little after 6pm, and it is already dark and cold. A man walks up to you. He pulls a gun out of his jacket pocket and tells you to hand it over. You reach into your pants pocket and grab your wallet. Your wallet contains your Illinois Firearms Owners Identification Card. It also contains your Concealed Carry License. You’re armed.

You hand the robber your wallet. You draw your gun and shoot your attacker in the chest. The attacker drops his gun, and you step back inside the store to call police.

David-  This is a tough one, mostly for the decision the citizen had to make. Good thing he was prepared to make it.

Rob- Why was this a hard decision?

David- On one hand, the robber had the wallet, and some might say it is over at that point, and you should just let him leave. On the other hand, the news story doesn’t indicate that the robber had shown any inclination to leave, although he had pulled a gun on his intended victim. Personally, I would not trust that person not to harm me, and it appears our victim felt the same. I don’t blame him.

Rob- We’re depending on a robber to be honest and keep his part of the bargain. Is that a good plan?

David- We’re hearing more self defense gun stories out of Chicago these days. That’s good.

Rob- Giving the robber the wallet was a distraction. What do your students have to learn before they can quickly and confidently present a loaded firearm from inside a winter coat?

Exit-  Rob- That wraps up this episode. David, thank you for helping us today.  Where can our listeners learn more about you?

David- Our listeners can find me at Black Man With A Gun and on my Aegis Solutions Facebook page.

Rob- Our listeners can share their thoughts with us by leaving a message on the podcast facebook page.  

David-   If you liked this show, then you’ll like the other podcasts on the Self-defense radio network.  

We share this podcast with you for free.  Please share it with a friend and give us a rating on I-Tunes and Stitcher.  We’re also available on Google Play Music and Spotify.

Rob- I’m Rob Morse.  We’ll be back next week with more Self-Defense Gun Stories.

Episode 85 with David Cole

Welcome to episode 84. Instructor David Cole joins us this week with three new self-defense stories. Were these gun owners lucky, or were they armed with tools and training? How would you react in their situation? (17 minutes)

Rob- Introduction- Welcome to episode 85 of Self-Defense Gun Stories.  This podcast is for people who think they might want a firearm.. and for those who already have one.  I’m your host, Rob Morse, and firearms instructor David Cole joins us as to co-host this week.

Hi, David.  How have you been?

David- Hi, Rob.  I got a new gun and am learning to use it.

Rob- David, please introduce our show.

David- Each week we discuss three recent examples of armed civilian defense to see what we can learn. Leave us a message on our facebook page with your questions or comments.

David- Our first story took place last week in Dallas, Texas. Tell us what happened.

Rob- First story-  Are you armed at home?  

You hear music blaring from a car out on the street.  A few minutes later, you hear someone banging on your front door.  It is 5 in the morning. You answer the door and a stranger asks to come in. You tell him he has the wrong address and can’t come inside. The stranger seems confused and angry, but he leaves.

A few minutes later the stranger returns and kicks down your front door. You grab the gun from your nightstand and confront the stranger standing in your home. You shoot him several times. Then, the intruder runs away. Police retrieve him from your front yard.

David, what can we learn from this story?

David- It sounds like the man may have been on drugs, and I noticed that the police took samples from the intruder’s car for testing.

Rob- What did our homeowner do right?

David- The door was locked.

Rob- Why is that important?

David- They have to force their way inside.

David- The homeowner was armed.

Rob- How did the homeowner get his gun?

David- We don’t know.

Rob- How did the homeowner identify the intruder in the dark?

David- flashlight, or maybe the home lights were still on after the earlier visit.

Rob- Should the homeowner have called the police after the first contact even though no crime had yet been committed?

David- That’s a tough call, but it was definitely suspicious in my book. Could at least call non-emergency for extra patrol. I personally would not have opened the door at all. No one I know is going to come knocking without calling first, and you’re under no obligation to open the door to a stranger at 5 AM.

Rob- Anything else?

David- Get better door locks.

David- Our second story happened last week in Lancaster County, South Carolina.

Rob- Second Story-  Are you armed in the morning?

Someone rings your doorbell at 8 in the morning. You answer it. A stranger forces his way inside. You try to push him out and he pushes you away. You reach for your phone, and the stranger grabs it. You run to your room and get your gun. You shoot when they criminal follows you. Now the criminal runs away.

You identify your intruder. He has outstanding warrants for first-degree burglary, kidnapping and first-degree assault.

David- That says that the old saying..just call the police..is a lie. You won’t have time and you won’t have an opportunity until the criminal is done with you.

Rob- Let’s talk about our homeowner. What did she do right?

David- The door was locked. That meant the intruder couldn’t open the door and take her by surprise.  That is good…but when you voluntarily open the door to an unknown, the lock is no longer a factor.  Also, she tried to retreat and call the police, and she owned a gun. That is good too, but there is a lot we can learn. Better to have your gun on your person, where it is secure and immediately accessible.

Rob- What do you tell your students to do?

David- Carry all the time, and don’t open the door to strangers!

Rob- Should we talk through the door?

David- Yes. Try it some time. A common ploy is for the would be intruder to ask for help of some sort…their car is broken down, etc. Instead of opening the door, offer to make a call for them.

Rob- What else can we learn from her experience.

David- Have a gun on your body, preferably concealed. Practice with it so you can present it and hit your attacker with the first shot.

Rob- An unloaded gun would have been worthless to this woman. I wonder how she called the police. Did the criminal take her phone, or did he drop it after she shot at him.

David- Along with a gun, keep a cell phone on your person. Even your old flip phones will still call 911.  Have a plan for escape if necessary. Possibly meet your neighbors so you have some place to run. That way you can call the police from someplace safe.

David- Our third story happened last week in Keithville, Louisiana.

DRGO

 

Rob- Third story- Can you defend yourself at home?

You heard something. You looked through the porch windows to see four young men wearing hoodies and carrying backpacks on your porch. It is 10 in the morning and you’re armed. You answer the front door with your gun in your hand. That isn’t what this robbery crew hoped to find. They run away. A neighbor had already called the police. The four were arrested. The police found the hoodies, backpacks, and a large knife. They were booked for Simple Burglary, Possession of Burglary Tools, and Possession of Marijuana.

David- I’m glad she had a gun, but please don’t open the door.

Rob- What do you tell your students to do?

David- You are under no obligation to open your door to strangers. You don’t even have to speak to them, but if you choose to, you can do it through the door.

Rob- Was this homeowner well prepared, or was she lucky?

David- It sounds like she did not have her gun with her. She would have been overwhelmed if the robbers had broken in and she was away from her gun.

Rob- This story took place in Louisiana. It is an open carry state, so even if she didn’t have a carry permit, our homeowner could carry everywhere on her property. Suppose one of your students had never touched a gun before.  Walk us through it. How many classes would they usually take before the could carry and present a firearm to protect themselves?

David- The basics can be learned in a day, easily…and “super advanced” skills are just not necessary. The reason a firearm is such an effective defensive tool is because it is so easy to use. The very argument many anti-gun people offer against gun ownership is that it makes it too easy to do violence…but that is precisely what makes it so useful in self defense! Probably just as important is to know the law regarding use of force, and books like Andrew Branca’s “Law of Self Defense” or Massad Ayoob’s “Deadly Force” are great resources.

Exit-  Rob- That wraps up this episode. David, thank you for helping me today.  Where can our listeners learn more about you?

Dave- I teach in the Cincinnati area. You can find my company, Aegis Solutions on Facebook.  Also, my articles on gun rights are at Black Man With A Gun.

Rob- Our listeners can share their thoughts with us by leaving a message on the podcast facebook page.  

David- We share this podcast with you for free.  Please share it with a friend and give us a rating on I-Tunes and Stitcher.  We’re also available on Google Play Music.

Rob- I’m Rob Morse.  We’ll be back next week with more Self-Defense Gun Stories.

Please support Buckeye Firearms Foundation at https://www.buckeyefirearmsfoundation.org/

Episode 77 with David Cole

Welcome to episode 77. Instructor David Cole joins us this week with three new self-defense stories. Were these gun owners lucky, or were they armed with tools and knowledge? How would you react in their situation? (16 minutes)

Rob- Introduction- I’m Rob Morse and welcome to episode 77 of Self-Defense Gun Stories.  This podcast is for people who think they might want a firearm.. and those who already have one.  We’re joined this week by self-defense instructor David Cole.

Hi, David.  How have you been?

David- Hi, Rob.  You went to Africa since we talked last time.

I did, and it was an amazing experience. I’d highly recommend it to anyone; if you’ve ever thought about hunting Africa, do it.  It was a very manageable trip.  Even the days I didn’t shoot were wonderful.

Hi to our new listeners, and welcome back to our regular listeners. We report and analyze three examples of armed civilian defense.  We hope you use these reports as part of your exercise program.. to use your imagination today so you can defend the people you care about tomorrow.  Please leave us a message on our facebook page with your questions or comments.

David- Our first story took place last week in Corpus Christi, Texas.

Rob- First story-  Are you armed at home?

This isn’t your first hurricane, but all storms bring a lot of wind and rain. You’re staying home to ride this one out.  That doesn’t mean it is quiet outside.  There is the roar of the storm, but then you hear a different sound.  Someone is breaking into your home at 11 at night.  You’ve lost power, so you walk toward the sound through your darkened home.  You see an intruder in your home. You shout for him to leave.  The intruder moves moves toward you, and you shoot him.

You retreat to your bedroom and call police on your cell phone.  They pick up the injured intruder from the front of your home and take him to the hospital.

Physical details of a break in.

David- We have seen this many times in the past; during situations where there are evacuations and police services are overwhelmed, predators take advantage.

Rob-  So we need to upgrade our hurricane kit?

David-  A flashlight to identify an intruder is essential. From a legal perspective, you will have a hard time articulating why the person you shot was a threat if you can’t see them. From a safety perspective, you don’t want to accidentally shoot a friend or family member, or in a situation like in Texas, maybe a rescue worker.

David- Glad this homeowner had a gun in hand.  No time to go back and get it after you’ve identified the problem.

No power, so a way to contact the authorities, and in a disaster scenario, it will likely be some time before they can respond, if they can at all.

YOU ARE ON YOUR OWN.

In this order.  Protect yourself with a firearm. You need a flashlight to sort out the problem. You need a cell phone to contact the police and medical personnel.

Rob- David, should you retreat and call police if the police can’t get to your home in a storm?

David- That may be an option, but disaster conditions could prevent that. Our second story happened last week in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Rob- Second Story-  Are you armed as you walk home?

You’re walking home from the shopping center with your son.  It is after dark, and you just withdrew some cash at the automatic teller machine.  Now you’re walking past the houses in your neighborhood when a young man runs up behind you.  He hits you in the back of the head with a rock.  You fall to the ground.  You roll over as the young man tries to go through your pockets.  You reach into your pocket and present your firearm.  You shoot twice.  The robber runs to a waiting getaway car.

The story doesn’t say who called police and EMTs.  You go to the hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

David- Predators attack from behind. Situational awareness is critical. I’d also advise against using outdoor or stand-alone ATMs. You are too exposed to observation and attack. Avoid them if possible; go inside a bank instead.

Rob- You just came from Africa.  Is an ATM is a watering hole for muggers?  

David- Yes, and the jewelry store, and the cell phone store. Good defense. Fortunately, the victim was not knocked unconscious (or worse) and was able to keep his wits about him.

Rob-  He was hurt.

David- Ask for medical treatment if you’ve been hurt. Besides the actual need to take care of yourself, it may also become important in court proceedings if self defense is brought into question in court.

Rob- Could you explain that a little more?

David – Sure. Think of it this way: if you are being charged with a crime for shooting someone, and claim self-defense, a record of actually being treated for injuries will provide medical proof that you were attacked and injured.

Rob- it established that you were really attacked.

David- And only offer critical or time-sensitive information to police until after you contact your attorney. Don’t make an official statement until your lawyer is present.

Rob- A witness gave the police a license number on the getaway car.

David- Our third story happened last week in Houston, Texas.

Please support Buckeye Firearms Foundation at https://www.buckeyefirearmsfoundation.org/

 

Rob- Third story- Are you armed when you’re at home?  

You’re set for hurricane Harvey to arrive.  You have water, candles and food.  You also have your gun.  It is already hard to travel because of the water covering the roads.  You’re asleep in your darkened home when you hear someone else inside your home.  It is three in the morning.  You leave your bedroom and go see what’s happening.  You find a stranger inside your home.  He moves toward you and you shoot.

Then you have to call police..and fix a broken door..at night..during a storm.

David-  Again, having immediate access to necessary tools…firearm, flashlight, phone…is critical. And again, there may be power outages so having fresh batteries in your light and cell phone is very important.

Rob- We used the breaking door as an alarm again.

David – A good reason to keep your doors locked, even when you are at home.  Another part of preparedness is training. Have you ever fired your defensive firearm in the dark or low light before? It is a skill worth practicing, and usually the only opportunity to do that sort of thing is in a training class.

 

 

Exit-  Rob- That wraps up this episode. David, thank you for helping me today.  Where can our listeners learn more about you?

Dave- I train in the Cincinnati area.  My training company, Aegis Solutions LLC is on Facebook, and my articles on gun rights and more can be found at Black Man With A Gun.

Rob- Our listeners can share their thoughts with us by leaving a message on the podcast facebook page.  

David-   If you liked this show, then you’ll like the other podcasts on the Self-defense radio network.  

We share this podcast with you for free.  Please share it with a friend and give us a rating on I-Tunes and Stitcher.  We’re also available on Google Play Music.

Rob- I’m Rob Morse.  We’ll be back next week with more Self-Defense Gun Stories.

Listen to Gun Freedom Radio at http://gunfreedomradio.com

Episode 66 with David Cole

Welcome to episode 66 of Self-Defense Gun Stories. Self-defense instructor David Cole joins us this week. We report and analyze examples of armed civilian defense. Were these gun owners lucky, or were they prepared? How would you do in their situation? (17 minutes )

Rob- Introduction- I’m Rob Morse and welcome to episode 66 of Self-Defense Gun Stories.  This podcast is for people who think they might want a firearm.. and those who already have one.  We’re joined this week by self-defense instructor Dave Cole.

Hi, Dave.  How have you been?

Dave- Hi, Rob.  I’ve been busy, as usual.  Teaching, training, competing, and getting ready for an African safari…my work is never done!  

Hi to our new listeners, and welcome back to our regular listeners. We’ll look at three examples of armed civilian defense.  Mental preparation is just as important as physical training, and we hope you use these reports as part of your training program; use your imagination today so you can defend the people you care about tomorrow.  Please leave us a message on our facebook page with your questions or comments.

Rob, we have a message from one of our listeners.  Bob said,

I was very disappointed when I heard Amber say her bank doesn’t allow concealed carry. Amber…change banks!  Our gun club had a couple of Certificate of Deposits at a local bank – until the bank put a sign up “prohibiting” weapons. We closed our account and told them why we were taking our CDs to their competitor’s bank down the street. Amber, your money speaks volumes!

Rob- Bob, thank you for writing in and thank you for all you do.  You probably never noticed those no-gun signs until you started carrying concealed in public.  You notice them now, and I want another million people on your side of the argument.

Dave, can you carry concealed in Kentucky banks?

Dave- As long as they are not posted.  Banks are private property, so the individual banks can make their own rules…fortunately, my bank does not post, and I believe that most do not. And I’d reiterate this from Bob’s comment: don’t just leave a business that posts “no gun” signs…speak to management and tell them WHY you’re taking your business elsewhere.

Our first story took place last week in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Rob- First story-  Are you armed in your apartment in the middle of the day?

School is out.  You’re at home with your four small children.  The oldest child is seven and the youngest is a newborn.  Your first sign of trouble is a crashing sound from down stairs. You wonder if the kids knocked something over.  Then you hear a man’s voice inside your apartment.  You grab your gun and fly down the stairs.  A young man is standing inside your broken door, and he has a gun.  You raise your pistol and fire.  Most wounds from a handgun aren’t incapacitating.  This one was.  Your attacker falls to the ground.  Your neighbors reported two other young men who ran away from the scene.  You and your children are uninjured.

Dave-  This incident is a prime example of why our defensive weapon should be on our person – at home.  Especially if there are children in the home.

Rob- Why is that?

Dave- Guns should never be left where unauthorized persons can get them.  At the same time, we have to consider how long it might take to access that gun when we need it.  Will there be time?  Where in your home is it, and will you be able to get to it? Where are your kids, and will you have to leave them behind to get to your gun? I’d imagine most people will have their secure storage in a bedroom or somewhere else, not in the main living area.  Think for a second about how most homes are set up, and where you spend the bulk of your time while at home.  How would you get to your defensive firearm in an emergency? Of course, if you simply keep your gun on your person, you don’t have to worry about any of this…it is always right where you need it, when you need it.

Rob- That reminds me of another listener comment I received. This listener took my challenge to go get his gun in his home. The listener walked quickly from his living room to his bedroom where he keeps his firearm.  He opened his safe, grabbed his handgun, and walked back to his living room.  It took him 31 seconds.

Dave- Half a minute is forever in an emergency.  Just ask anyone who has ever had to race for a gun during such a time! Home invasion can happen very quickly, and you may not have time to access a “staged” gun. Perhaps another useful exercise for the listener would be to time himself from his front door to his living room…the time it would take an attacker to reach him. Or if the two paths would intersect…how long from the front door to the intersection…that’s where you might bump into a bad guy on the way to your gun!

And one more point on home carry, Rob. We know that even armed, “clearing” a house is extremely dangerous, so we usually advise people that it’s better to arm yourself, and barricade yourself in a room and call police. If you have to go get your gun first, you’re increasing your risk…if your gun is on your person, you don’t have to move.

Also…where’s your phone to call the police? Mine is in my pocket, all the time, while I’m at home.

The gun wasn’t all that saved this family…a locked door made a difference, too.

Rob- How did the locked door help this young woman?

Dave-  The breaking of the door is what alerted her to the danger she and her children were in.  The door was her alarm.  It also added valuable response time. Even a few seconds can make the difference, and a locked door will at least slow down an attacker.

Rob-  Was lethal force justified?

Dave-  She faced an armed intruder.  State laws can vary a bit with things like castle doctrine and duty to retreat, but i don’t know of one that does not allow an armed response to an armed intruder in your home. Another factor is the presence of children in the home…the adult cannot simply flee and leave the children behind.

Rob-  So the law recognizes that you’re protecting your children?

Dave- Yes. We are typically allowed to use force to defend another who would have been justified in using the same level of force themselves. If the children would have been justified in using that force in self defense (and they would have been), then the mother can use that level of force to defend them. And even if she were alone, she could still articulate that she was reasonably in fear for her life or serious bodily injury, since the intruder was armed and inside her home. She was clearly in mortal danger.

Rob- Dave, you teach your students about a situation like this one.  How many times do you teach them to fire their gun?

Dave- We shoot to stop the threat, so we shoot until the threat is gone. Or, as I often put it, “shoot until they stop doing whatever it was that made you start shooting.”

Our second story also took place in Indianapolis.

Rob- Second Story-  Are you armed at home in the middle of the night?   

You and your family are asleep.  You hear the sound of breaking glass from the front of your house.  You grab your gun and investigate.  You see a young man standing in your living room.  You raise your handgun and fire.  The robber takes a few steps and falls.

You wife and children are uninjured.

Police say the robber was unarmed..this time. Two months ago he was arrested for possessing drugs and a stolen gun.  Last month he was arrested for hit-and-run with an automobile while intoxicated.  Last week the robber was arrested for theft and drugs.

Dave- Good the homeowner had a gun.  How about a flashlight?  Even in a state like Indiana that has a castle doctrine, you still want to be able to identify your target.  This is especially important in a home like this one, where there are other family members. Is that shape in the dark a bad guy, or just a family member who got up to use the bathroom in the night? Too often we hear of tragedies of mistaken identity that could have been prevented with a simple flashlight.

Rob-  So if you want to protect your home, first get a flashlight.

Dave-  Yes.  That is at the top of your emergency list.  Also, let’s talk about gun storage at night, when we’re asleep. Where do you keep your gun when you’re asleep?

Rob- Mine is in a quick access safe.  Why is that important? Why wouldn’t I just put my gun on my nightstand..or under the mattress?

Dave-  There are a couple of reasons. The first is secure storage.  You need your gun secured all the time.  Don’t leave a gun, even an unloaded gun, where children could get it.  Have you ever had one of your kids come into your bedroom at night? What if they picked up your gun off of your nightstand?

Also, consider the process of waking up. Even when we wake up startled…like to the sound of a window breaking…it takes a couple of seconds to orient ourselves. Using some sort of quick-access secure storage forces us to take a step before putting a gun in our hand, allowing time to clear our head and avoid a tragic mistake…especially in a home we share with others.

Rob- Not even if the gun is unloaded?

Dave- Not even if it is unloaded.  You are responsible to control that firearm all the time.  When it is on your body and when it is off.  It is your gun.  It doesn’t belong under the pillow.  I doesn’t belong between the mattresses.  You have to secure it…And be able to get to it quickly.

Rob- so you keep your home defense guns locked up, but loaded?

Dave- Yes. If it is not on my person, it’s secured. If it’s my defensive firearm, it’s loaded.

Rob- What else can we learn from this story?

Dave- The story doesn’t say who called the police, but it would be awesome if the wife was on the phone getting help.  A team effort…you deal with the threat, she gets the call out to police. Plan not just your response to a threat, but your whole family’s response.

Rob- Teamwork. David, I practiced those calls, and I was mumble mouthed until I practiced them several times.

Dave- That means our listeners have homework.  Our third story happened last week just west of Philadelphia.

Please support the Crime Prevention Research Center at
http://crimeresearch.org/

Rob- Third story- Are you armed when you’re walking down the street at mid-day?  

You and your friend are walking down the street just before noon on a Sunday morning.  Another man gets out of a car and approaches you.  He yells for you to stop.  He pulls a knife.  You and your friend back away.  You tell the attacker that you’re armed.  You draw your gun and hold it at the low ready.  Your attacker continues to advance toward you and your friend.  You raise your gun and shoot.

Your attacker grabs his leg.  The two people in the car drive away.  You call police.  You explain that you have your concealed carry permit.

Dave-  Bringing a knife to a gunfight? Not a good idea. I do hope that the shot in the leg wasn’t intentional. Despite what Hollywood tells us, it isn’t a great target.

Rob- Is this attack a one-in a million event?

Dave- Specifically, your odds of being a victim of violent crime in the US are about 4 out of 100, according to the FBI. http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/02/21/5-facts-about-crime-in-the-u-s/

But locally, your mileage may vary. In Philadelphia, the homicide rate this year is already up 19%, with 140 reported so far. https://www.phillypolice.com/crime-maps-stats/

Rob-  But during your lifetime, what are the realistic odds that you’ll be the victim of a violent attack?

Dave-  The short answer is: it depends. About one out of three of us will be attacked during our lifetime, but your milage may vary.  The longer version is that it depends greatly on specifically where you live, and your own behavior. People who consort with drug dealers, etc…tend to get dead more often than those of us who behave ourselves.

That said, I think the calculus is not that simple. We don’t want to consider just the odds of an attack, but the stakes involved…the consequences if it does happen. Living in a suburban area as I do, living the life of a law abiding citizen, I am probably about as likely to be attacked as I am to be struck by lightning…but people DO get struck by lightning, you know. So despite the fact that an attack may be unlikely, I am unwilling to accept the consequences of being defenseless if it does…so I am armed.

And remember, if you are a parent or responsible for small children, you are making this choice for them, too. To me, it is not worth risking the consequences of going unarmed.

 

Exit-  Rob- That wraps up this episode. Dave, thank you for helping me today.  Where can our listeners learn more about you?

Dave- My training company, Aegis Solutions LLC is on Facebook, and my articles on gun rights and more can be found at Black Man With A Gun…including my latest commentary on the recent attack on the GOP baseball practice. http://blackmanwithagun.com/shootout-or-massacre

Rob- Our listeners can share their thoughts with us by leaving a message on the podcast facebook page.  

Dave-  If you liked this show, then you’ll like the other podcasts on the Self-defense radio network.  We create this podcast under a creative commons license, so please share it with a friend, and give us a rating on I-Tunes.

Rob- I’m Rob Morse.  We’ll be back next week with more Self-Defense Gun Stories.

https://drgo.us/

 

Episode 61 with David Cole

Welcome to episode 61 of Self-Defense Gun Stories. Firearms instructor David Cole joins us this week. Together, we report and analyze examples of armed civilian defense. Were these gun owners lucky, or were they prepared? How would you do in their situation?

Introduction- Rob- I’m Rob Morse.  Welcome to episode 61 of Self-Defense Gun Stories.  This show is for  people who think they might want a firearm for self-defense, and those who already have one.  We’re joined this week by self-defense instructor David Cole.

Hi, David.  How have you been?

David- Hi, Rob.  Seems like just yesterday we were hanging out at the NRA Annual Meetings & Exhibits in Atlanta. It sure was a great show this year.

Hi to our new listeners, and welcome back to our regular listeners. We report and analyze three examples of armed civilian defense.  We hope you use these reports as part of your exercise program.. to exercise your imagination today so you can defend the people you care about tomorrow.  Please leave us a message on our facebook page with your questions or comments.

David- Our first story took place last week in Jacksonville, Florida.

Rob- First story-  Are you armed when you arrive home?  You return home at about 10 in the morning.  Unfortunately, a robber is waiting for you.  He follows you to the door and forces his way inside.  He then tries to take your purse and you phone.  You fight.  You grab your handgun and shoot your attacker.  He runs from your home.  You slam the door and call the police.  The police arrest your attacker when he called for medical attention.

David- Fortunately, our good citizen was prepared…she had a gun handy and was ready to use it.

Rob-  We can’t tell how she got her gun.  What do you tell your students?

David- She also did the right thing by calling 911 and reporting the incident.

David- Our second story happened last week in Memphis, Tennessee.

Rob- Second Story-  Are you armed at work late at night.  You work at a liquor store.  It is never completely safe.  Yesterday, the police visited your store to warn you about a series of liquor store robberies in the area.  It is 11 at night when a man walks in wearing a ski mask.  It isn’t cold outside.  The masked man presents a gun and starts yelling at you to get down on the floor.  You draw your pistol and shoot your attacker several times.  You back away and call police.  No one else was injured.  The FBI links the attacker to eight other robberies.

David- This one was kind of obvious, but sometimes it can be difficult to see trouble coming. But a guy in a ski mask in a liquor store at 11 PM is most likely not your friend.

Rob- Talk about a risky occupation.  The police told him to be ready..and he was.

David- The clerk was prepared with a gun of his own, and did what he had to do to defend himself.

Rob- Should we do what a criminal demands?

David- That’s a tough call, and the only 100% correct answer is “it depends.” But compliance doesn’t increase our chances of going home unhurt. There are plenty of examples of robberies where the victim gave the robber what they demanded, and were shot anyway.  My personal opinion is that you are taking a big chance when you count on mercy from someone willing to threaten your life for your purse or wallet.

David- Our third story happened last week in Arlington, Texas.

Please support Buckeye Firearms Foundation at https://www.buckeyefirearmsfoundation.org/

Rob- Third story- Are you armed when you visit a sports bar?  You’re sitting in a sports bar with family and friends when you hear the yelling.  A stranger is yelling at everyone.  The restaurant manager goes over to talk the the man.  The stranger is upset, and the manager is trying to calm him down.  The stranger yells louder, then he pulls a gun from his pocket and shoots the manager.  You tell your wife to get on the floor.  You crouch down and draw your own firearm.  People are running wildly.  The attacker is shooting towards people as they run for the front door.  The crowd thins for a second and you take your shot.  The attacker stops shooting.  You and your family leave the scene, but you don’t go far.  You know you have to talk to police.  They say the attacker had two guns and two knives on him.  The manager died at the scene..along with the attacker.  The only other injury was one customer he cut himself on the broken glass as he left.

David-  This one had the potential to be much, much worse..but for a good guy with a gun. And it seems like this week’s theme could easily be Jeff Cooper’s first rule of gunfighting: “Have a gun.”

Rob-

David- Laws regarding carry in bars vary from state to state

Exit- Rob- That wraps up this episode. David, thank you for helping me today.  Where can our listeners learn more about you?

David- Our listeners can find me at

Rob- Our listeners can share their thoughts with us by leaving a message on the podcast facebook page.  

David-  If you liked this show, then you’ll like the other podcasts on the Self-defense radio network.  We create this podcast under a creative commons license, so please share them with a friend, and give us a rating on I-Tunes.

Rob- I’m Rob Morse.  We’ll be back next week with more Self-Defense Gun Stories.

Learn more at SAF Training Division.

Episode 53 with David Cole

Welcome to episode 53 of Self-Defense Gun Stories. Firearms instructor David Cole joins us this week. We report and analyze examples of armed civilian defense. Were these gun owners lucky, or were they prepared?

I had to re-record some of the audio.  🙁

Introduction- Rob- I’m Rob Morse, and welcome to episode 53 of Self-Defense Gun Stories.  This podcast is for  people who think they might want a gun for self-defense, and those who already have one.  Firearms instructor Dave Cole is with us this week.

It has been a little cold to compete outside, but other than that, how have you been?

Dave- Hi, Rob.  Yeah, it’s too cold and dark to shoot steel after work, but it’s getting lighter and warmer every day. Check out my latest post at Black Man With A Gun, called “March Madness” for more about the benefits of competition.

Hi to our new listeners, and welcome back to our regular listeners. We report and analyze three examples of armed civilian defense each week.  I hope we inspire you to defend the people you care about.  If you have questions or want to hear more, then please leave us a message on our facebook page.

Our first story took place this month in Nebraska.

First story-  Are you armed at your local barbershop?  You and your brother run a barbershop together.  Your family lives upstairs, and you’re both cutting hair on a Friday morning.  Customers were in the chars and in the shop waiting their turn.  That is when a stranger walked in and pushed to the front of the line.

This stranger was carrying a shotgun and a backpack.  He dropped the backpack on the ground and  pointed the shotgun at you.  He yelled, “You and everyone else, put everything in the bag.”

You glance at your brother.  He nods in reply.

“Here, take it,” you say, as you throw your wallet on the floor.  You and your brother are both licensed to carry.  You’re both armed.  You wait your turn and step back.  Your brother draws first as the thief reaches down to grab your wallet.  Your gun is drawn a second later.  The thief shoots at you, and then both you and your brother are shooting at him.  The thief runs from your barbershop.  The entire robbery was over in seconds and captured on your security video.

You had a plan.  Other stores in the area were robbed.  You knew what you’d do because you talked about it before.  You tell reporters that everyone needs a plan.

The police collected the robber from where he’d collapsed outside.  They took him to a local hospital, and wouldn’t comment on his condition.  The thief’s bullets shattered a mirror on the back wall.  Thank goodness that neither you, your family or your customers were injured.  You and your brother start sweeping up the broken glass.

Dave- Violent attacks happen fast.  Knowing what to do saves you time.  Having a plan can be more important than having the fastest draw. Visualize your daily routine, and when and where an attack might happen. Then think “what would I do?”

Rob-  But practice helps too, doesn’t it?

Dave-  Sure it helps to practice, but practice saves you fractions of a second.  Having a plan can save whole seconds…and that’s a lot. It’s important to note what their plan accomplished, which was to distract the robber by throwing a wallet on the floor, creating the opportunity for the armed brother to draw his gun.

This is the value of “wargaming” scenarios…actually thinking about how a violent encounter might go down, and then how you might deal with it.

Rob-  You don’t have ten seconds to calm down and think.

Dave- Our second story took place in California.

Second Story-  Are you armed at work at 3 in the morning?

It’s a messy business, but someone has to do it if your customers want fresh pastry and doughnuts on their way to work.   You don’t stay in the bakery business if flour and sugar bother you.  All is not sweetness and light here in Lancaster, California.  Being a baker means you go to work in the dark.  Your day is half done by the time most people wake up.  Your daughter owns the shop, but you help her at night.

It was early morning when you heard the crash of glass from the front of the shop.  You looked up and saw two man run past the cash register and head towards the back of the store.  He’s carrying the tire iron he used to break through the front of the store.   Your daughter was back there.  You drew your firearm and fired.  Both thieves turned and ran.  One of the thieves dropped the cash register.  The other one dropped to the pavement outside.

You called police.  You’d thought about what to say because you’d been robbed before at another bakery where you worked. That is why you were carrying today.  You couldn’t get a concealed carry permit since you work in Los Angeles County, but you can still carry at work and at home.  Neither you nor the other employees at the store were hurt.

Dave- (There are California gun owners. Carry at work.  Carry on your body. Protect the people you care about.) Once again, here is a business owner who was prepared. People who work at odd hours such as this bakery owner, convenience store workers, and the like are often at high risk for crime. Rob, you have more intimate knowledge of California gun laws than I do, but it IS possible to have a defensive firearm, right?

Dave- So this baker didn’t simply surrender his safety to restrictive California gun laws; he found a way to do what he could within the constraints of the law to be prepared for violent crime, and it made all the difference.

Dave- Our third story took place in Idaho.

http://www.armedlutheran.us/

Third story- Rob- Are you armed when you’re driving your young daughter to school in the morning?  Monday’s are hard.  You got your 9-year-old daugher up, got her fed and had just dropped her off at school in Boise, Idaho.  You were driving alone and had slowed down to stop at the corner.  That is when a man jumped in front of your car and pulled open the driver’s side door.  You slammed on the brakes and the car stalled.  The carjacker demanded your keys and your purse.  He started hitting you in the head when he didn’t get what he wanted as fast as he wanted it.

Your attacker grabbed your hair and tried to drag you out of your car.  You yelled, “’OK, OK, that’s enough! I’ll give you my purse.”  That is what you said, but that isn’t what you did.  You reached into the console of your car and grabbed your gun.  You turned and pointed your pistol at your attacker.  His plans changed in an instant.  He turned and ran.

You called the police.  The suspect is still at large.

Dave-  Great job to this mom.  She thought about what to do because you don’t have time to think while you’re getting hit in the head.  If there’s a common theme in our stories today, it’s “have a plan.” While the saying that “no plan survives the first contact,” it is still better to have a plan and adapt as necessary, than to have no plan at all.

It was fortunate that her daughter wasn’t with her, which would have made for a much more complex problem.  I can imagine how I would feel if my young nieces were in the car while I was attacked.  But that’s exactly why I carry, and it’s great that this mom was prepared and had her gun near her.

This is where things get complicated.  I want our listeners to imagine they are driving with a child in the back seat.   What if the thief had jumped into the passenger seat and grabbed her purse and her gun?  I’m well trained, and I don’t want to have to solve that problem.

Better if she had her doors locked, especially since the news story doesn’t indicate that the carjacker was armed.  Better still if she had her gun on her person. What if he had managed to drag her out of the car and away from her gun?

 

 

Exit-  Rob- That wraps up this episode. Dave, thank you for helping me today.  Where can our listeners learn more about you?

Dave- I teach in the Cincinnati area.  They can contact me at Aegis Solutions for firearms instruction.  I also write at the Blackman with a Gun website.  Our listeners can reach me at either site. I’d also like to mention that our big “family reunion” is right around the corner…the NRA Annual Meetings & Exhibits, and we’d love to see you there. It’s in Atlanta, Georgia, April 27-30, at the Georgia World Congress Center.

Rob- Our listeners can share their thoughts with us by leaving a message on the podcast facebook page.  

Dave-  We create this podcast under a creative commons license, so please share them with a friend, and give us a rating on I-Tunes.

Rob- I’m Rob Morse.  We’ll be back next week with more Self-Defense Gun Stories.

CPRC_web

Please support the Crime Prevention Research Center at
http://crimeresearch.org/

 

Episode 47 with David Cole

Welcome to episode 47 of Self-Defense Gun Stories. Firearms instructor David Cole joins us this week. We report and analyze examples of armed civilian defense. Were these gun owners lucky, or were they prepared?

Introduction-  Rob- I’m Rob Morse, and welcome to episode 47 of Self-Defense Gun Stories.  This show is for new gun owners and people who think they might want a firearm for self-defense. We’re part of the Self-Defense Radio Network.   We have self-defense instructor David Cole with us this week.  How have you been, David?

David – Hi, Rob.  

Hi to our new listeners, and welcome back to our regular listeners. We report and analyze three examples of armed civilian defense each week.  I hope we inspire you to defend the people you care about.  If you have questions or want to hear more, then please leave us a message on our facebook page.

Rob, I have to say I’m really excited to talk about these three cases today, because they all have something in common…probably THE most important thing when it comes to self-defense. I’m not going to say what it is just yet, but I’m sure our listeners will figure it out by the end.

Our first story took place this month in Georgia.

First story-  Are you armed as you drive down the street?  A couple were driving in Midtown Atlanta.  The driver in front of them jumped out of his car and and tried to take theirs.  The victims stopped.  The two men struggled.  That is when the female victim drew her gun and shot their attacker.  Police were on the scene in a minute, even with the downtown traffic.  The carjacker had hit dozens of cars in an ongoing hit and run episode.  Police said the carjacker was on drugs.

David – Great job by the passenger in the car! While there is a lot we don’t know…method of carry, etc…what is apparent is that the passenger in the white Porsche acted quickly and decisively. From what we can tell, it seems that the armed passenger was immediately recognize the threat, decide, and then act without hesitation. That sort of awareness and decisiveness can make all the difference. It may have been very apparent in this case that action was warranted and what that action should be, but what gets folks in trouble all too often is that they aren’t able to see what is happening, accept that it is happening, and act in time to stop an attack.

 

David – Our second story took place just a few miles away, in Cobb County, Georgia.

Second Story-  Are you armed at work?  The store owner and his employee had opened the store only a few minutes earlier.  They already had two customers at Dixie Gun and Pawn.  Two more men entered, but these men were wearing ski-masks and carrying guns.  

“The robbers said, get down on the floor. Get down on the floor or I’ll kill you.”  

Then the robber fired his gun.  The owner drew his firearm and shot one of the robbers.  The second robber ran.  The wounded robber died at the scene.

The store owner said he hated to kill another man.  He had been burglarized many times.  The other store employee and the two customers were uninjured.

David – This is another example of how decisive action made the difference.  Had they been able to establish dominance, the two armed robbers would have been very difficult to overcome. They made it apparent that they were willing to kill to complete their crime, and had they established that dominance over the four people in the store…owner and two customers…they certainly could have killed them all. But the owner acted immediately, before they could establish that dominance…absolutely critical.

Rob- The owner had a plan.

 

David- Our third story took place in North Carolina.

Support Buckeye Firearms Foundation at https://www.buckeyefirearmsfoundation.org/

Third story- Are you armed as you arrive home after work?

A Wilmington woman arrived home after work at 11 in the evening.  She had a cup in one hand with her keys.  She was talking to her dad on the phone.  She unlocked her apartment door when a man pushed her inside.

The robber choked her.  He pushed her into her bedroom and tied her up.  The robber then searched the apartment.  The victim got her hands free and grabbed the gun she keeps beside her bed.  She shot the robber once in the chest.  The robber ran, but collapsed inside the apartment.  The victim called police.

She had the gun for over a year, but this was the first time she’d fired it.

The robber was a felon with over a dozen convictions.

David- Here’s another case where mindset and decisiveness come into play, in a slightly different way. While our armed citizen in this case did prevail…and we’re glad of it…there are some lessons we could take away.

Rob- She was successful, but what can we learn.

David- Some points for improvement are the fact that she wasn’t armed at the initial contact. Her gun was in her apartment, rather than on her person. It’s always going to be better to have it on you than not, if at all possible. It also sounds like although she had her keys in hand and another person on the line as she got out of her car and approached her home, she also had a drink in her hand…sounds like her hands were kind of full. Maybe unavoidable, maybe wouldn’t have made a difference…but definitely not optimal.

Rob-  What if the robber had tied her up in the living room?

David- But we should note that when she had the opportunity to act, she saw the opportunity and took decisive action to save her own life. Rather than give in to what could have been a tragic outcome, she worked to improve her position by getting free of her restraints, and then made a forceful and committed move. It’s a much better option than hoping the predator who just assaulted you and tied you up is going to let you live.

Rob- None of our victims thought they would be attacked.

David- In the unlikely case that anyone has not figured out the common thread in our three cases today…it’s MINDSET.  Recognizing a threat for what it is, and quickly making the decision to act. All three of our armed citizens today took prompt, decisive action to save their own lives in situations where even a moment’s hesitation could have been tragic.

Exit-  Rob- That wraps up this episode. David, thank you for helping me today.  Where can our listeners learn more about you?

David- I teach in the Cincinnati area.  They can contact me at Aegis Solutions for firearms instruction.  I also write at the Blackman with a Gun website.  Our listeners can reach me at either site.

Rob- Our listeners can share their thoughts with us by leaving a message on the podcast facebook page.  

David – If these examples inspired you, then please share them with a friend.  Would you also give us a rating on I-Tunes.

I’m Rob Morse.  Please join us next week for more Self-Defense Gun Stories.